(Source: Spotify)

“You need to build an ability to just be yourself and not be doing something. That’s what the phones are taking away, is the ability to just sit there. That’s being a person. Because underneath everything in your life there is that thing, that empty—forever empty. That knowledge that it’s all for nothing and that you’re alone. It’s down there.

And sometimes when things clear away, you’re not watching anything, you’re in your car, and you start going, ‘oh no, here it comes. That I’m alone.’ It’s starts to visit on you. Just this sadness. Life is tremendously sad, just by being in it…

That’s why we text and drive. I look around, pretty much 100 percent of the people driving are texting. And they’re killing, everybody’s murdering each other with their cars. But people are willing to risk taking a life and ruining their own because they don’t want to be alone for a second because it’s so hard.”

Data Dump: The First 100 Meals in the Life of Kitchensurfing

kitchensurfing:

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1. Greek-inspired brunch for 10 in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.

2. 3-course menu with appetizers for 20 guests in the East Village, Manhattan.

3. Allergy friendly dinner for a family of 4 in Park Slope, Brooklyn.

4. 3-course dinner for 12 in the East Village, Manhattan.

5. 3-course dinner for a discussion group of 12 in Boerum Hill, Brooklyn.

6. Greek-inspired tacos and sides for an extended family of 12 in New York.

7. Thai banquet for a dinner party of 22 on the Upper West Side, Manhattan.

8. 3-course steak dinner for 12, Gramercy, Manhattan.

9. Rooftop cookout for 100, Gramercy, Manhattan.

10. Authentic Yucután fish al pibil, Manhattan.

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My friend, Shantanu Starick, has been traveling around the world without using any money. He trades his amazing photography skills for food, shelter, and anything else he might need. His project is an inspiration and he’s been a wonderful comrade to me and a friend to my company, Kitchensurfing. A month or so ago, we did a trade where I took him on a very personal journey to places near and dear to me. We both needed it.

He documented the trade and posted an interview here: http://thepixeltrade.com/trade-civ

My friend, Shantanu Starick, has been traveling around the world without using any money. He trades his amazing photography skills for food, shelter, and anything else he might need. His project is an inspiration and he’s been a wonderful comrade to me and a friend to my company, Kitchensurfing. A month or so ago, we did a trade where I took him on a very personal journey to places near and dear to me. We both needed it.

He documented the trade and posted an interview here: http://thepixeltrade.com/trade-civ

“Make the truth good, then just tell it.”

Paul Graham

Written in the context of young companies, but good advice for life. On a par with this gem from a few years ago.

“THOUGHT EXPERIMENT. Does it change the myth of Sisyphus for you if Sisyphus is paid? Does it make it better or worse?”
“This represents Facebook’s biggest and most perplexing problem: supreme self-confidence uninhibited by extreme myopia. It’s why it released Home, a product that anyone outside of Facebook, down to a normal user, could have realized was a flawed idea. It’s why Facebook treats users’ data as if they have no choice but to stay — and why it interprets growing user numbers as permission to keep doing what it’s doing, but more aggressively.

Another way to interpret this: Facebook is out of ideas. In its view, nobody else can truly innovate, because without Facebook, an innovation doesn’t matter — an idea isn’t a big idea until it’s on Facebook, the real internet, with its billion graphed-out users. Facebook’s own innovations, like Graph Search, are limited by the same skewed perspective; they’re all based on the premise that people want more Facebook.”
Photo of Berlin from Space, Col. Chris Hadfield

This photo, taken from about 200 miles above Earth, shows the divide between East and West Berlin due to the difference in streetlighting. East Berlin has more sodium-vapor lamps with a yellow color, Western Berlin has more fluorescent lamps.

Photo of Berlin from Space, Col. Chris Hadfield

This photo, taken from about 200 miles above Earth, shows the divide between East and West Berlin due to the difference in streetlighting. East Berlin has more sodium-vapor lamps with a yellow color, Western Berlin has more fluorescent lamps.

“Judgment is about decision making, and a person can’t improve at decision making without being iteratively honest with themselves and others. If you are really honest with yourself and others, and they with you, you will eventually find yourself realizing who to talk to for what. This includes being honest about who you shouldn’t talk to.

Apply this to your life for a decade or so, and you might just find your Oracle.When you do, here is how you will know it: you will experience an honesty so uncaringly precise it will feel like the best form of caring you have ever known.

Andy Dunn, Judgment and Empathy {emphasis mine}

Andy is the CEO and Cofounder of Bonobos and is doing some of the best writing on business and startupland that’s come around in a long while. Some of it is highly rhetorical. Take a breath and read with a smile. Most things written about this world are poorly written and/or not well thought out—it’s refreshing.

“The assumption driving these kinds of design speculations [Google Glass] is that if you embed the interface–the control surface for a technology–into our own bodily envelope, that interface will “disappear”: the technology will cease to be a separate “thing” and simply become part of that envelope. The trouble is that unlike technology, your body isn’t something you “interface” with in the first place. You’re not a little homunculus “in” your body, “driving” it around, looking out Terminator-style “through” your eyes. Your body isn’t a tool for delivering your experience: it is your experience. Merging the body with a technological control surface doesn’t magically transform the act of manipulating that surface into bodily experience. I’m not a cyborg (yet) so I can’t be sure, but I suspect the effect is more the opposite: alienating you from the direct bodily experiences you already have by turning them into technological interfaces to be manipulated.”
“The poor are not the raw material for your salvation.”

Helder Camara, discovered in this lovely post by Liam Black.

More from Liam Black:

Each year the socially entrepreneurial Cirque de Soleil sets up its big tent at the World Economic Forum at Davos. Champagne is sipped whilst corporate CEOs, Russian oligarchs and Arab potentates ‘ooh’ and ‘aah’ at the miracles being performed by the social entrepreneurs. The Occupy movement activisits on the other hand are kept a long distance away and canapés are not put out for them. Their diet is tear gas and police truncheon.

Power, class – especially class – and entitlement are three subjects nowhere near high enough up the agenda of Skoll and Davos. It is very fashionable at such gatherings to hear mainstream politics trashed as unable to compete with the whizzy, sexy, genius social entrepreneurs. Yawn, party politics. How boring. How last century.

But ask yourself this: without political backing where will your idea get? What has had the biggest impact on well-being in this country in the last ten years? Eden Project? Big Issue? Jamie Oliver? Divine Chocolate? Or the government’s decision to ban smoking in all public places?